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A Fashionable Business

Discover more about women working as seamstresses, mantua-makers, and milliners in seventeenth and eighteenth century London.

Art supplies in London: the colour shops of Elizabeth Moseley and Anna Barnes

Painting in the seventeenth and eighteenth centuries required the careful preparation of tools and materials. Pigments were ground and mixed with oils or other mediums such as gum arabic to create a wide array of colours for painting. But what was a Colour Maker or Seller? It is worth quoting the entry in Joseph Collyer’sContinue reading “Art supplies in London: the colour shops of Elizabeth Moseley and Anna Barnes”

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A Hosier near Hungerford Market: Ann Hodgson and her Partnership in Trade

On 15 October 1718, Ann Hodgson ‘next the one Ton Tavern near Hungerford Market in the Strand’ took out an insurance policy for her goods and merchandise as a hosier.[1] No specific value for her stock was recorded but Sun Fire Office insurance policies usually covered goods worth up to £500 in this period (theContinue reading “A Hosier near Hungerford Market: Ann Hodgson and her Partnership in Trade”

Judith Gresham the elder (1632 – 1694)

Judith Gresham was a milliner on the Royal Exchange in the late seventeenth century. Judith Beckingham and Seliard Gresham were married on 26 February 1660 and thereafter had five children.[1] They were long-standing tenants of the Royal Exchange and Seliard Gresham bound at least three apprentices – Mary Cox, Thomas Marshall, and Edward Pettit – beforeContinue reading “Judith Gresham the elder (1632 – 1694)”